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welcome. this is me...

 

I carry a dictaphone everywhere and sing into it in muffled tones

Every song has hundreds of versions before it is ready

I love commissions which lead me to new places

I love writers who take me somewhere new

I get very inspired by the singers and musicians I write for

 
 
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Music

by Emily Hall

A selection of tracks from my recent albums Folie à DeuxBefalling and other works.

Available to buy today

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Much of Emily Hall's music is formed from close creative relationships with singers and writers and finding her own ways of using technology and live performance.

Much to her surprise, Emily has written 4 operas.

Emily Hall studied composition at York University and the Royal College of Music, London. She has written for many different ensembles and orchestras including the London Sinfonietta, LSO, BBCNOW, the Brodsky Quartet, Opera North, LCO, Hungarian Radio Choir. Her music has been broadcast on BBC Radio 2,3,4 and 6Music.

Her first opera, "Sante"(2006), produced by Aldeburgh Music, was described by The Times as "a dynamic new opera worth everyone's time and hopes”. Her second was a film-opera, "The Nightingale and the Rose"(2010), written for Streetwise Opera and created with filmmaker Gaelle Denis. Her third opera “Folie a Deux”(2015), is a concept album/opera, written with Icelandic author Sjon for singers Sofia Jernberg and Allan Clayton and produced by Mahogany Opera and released by Bedroom Community. And her fourth, "Found and Lost"(2016), a site-specific opera installation created for the Corinthia Hotel, London. She has written a trilogy of song cycles with the author Toby Litt, about first love ("Befalling"), motherhood ("Life Cycle") and death ("Rest").

Emily Hall is a member of Bedroom Community, the icelandic record label comprising 11 different diverse but like-minded musicians from across the globe.

In 2013, Emily Hall received the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Award for Artists, in 2006 the Genesis Opera Prize and in 2005 the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Award and in 2015 the Corinthia AIR. 

"Emily Hall's Restless Modernity Mixes Classical Precision With An Ear For Folk And Electronics."
MOJO (June 2015)
 

Life Cycle

Nightingale and the Rose

Press

Found & Lost

“All this is set to music by Emily Hall that artfully mixes lyrical indie-ish songs with sinister instrumental effects primarily supplied by Oliver Coates on cello and James McVinnie on organ; and pre-recorded solo voices (including such luminaries as Allan Clayton) with a peripatetic a cappella chorus serenading us along corridors.
"a bold project" 
The Times, Richard Morrison, **** 

"Part of the fascination is that you are never sure who are the real guests and staff, and who is acting a part.” 
The Stage

“it’s surely rather brilliant.” 
Whats on Stage

“startling and often beautiful music" 
Guardian, Fiona Maddocks

“Ingenious" 
Guardian, Fiona Maddocks

“At times it wasn’t clear whether the empty cups on a tray outside a room, or the people dining, were part of the performance, but that was all part of the quiet drama.” 
Guardian, Fiona Maddocks

“The real pleasure comes in stepping out of a lift and finding cellist Oliver Coates playing in a corner, or in being led down a thickly carpeted corridor by the superb a cappella chorus (members of Siglo de Oro) who sing Hall’s close harmonies and melodies: she is a composer steeped in song, her music immediately appealing. If anyone can make an exquisite lullaby out of a hotel’s “turndown checklist”(one chocolate box on either side, eight cotton balls in the jar, slippers in pairs), Hall is the one and I’ll happily stay in her hotel.” 
Guardian, Fiona Maddocks

Folie à Deux

"Emily Hall's restless modernity mixes classical precision with an ear for folk and electronics. Folie à Deux is another of her ultra-melodic hybrids" 
MOJO (June 2015)

"...the recording, concisely presented in a thirty-nine-minute form, provides no small number of listening pleasures." 
Textura (June 29th 2015)

"it is intriguing and beautiful. It is full of delicately entwined vocals which intersect across each other and includes the harmonious partnership of classical music and minimalistic electronics – something that, to my mind, is rarely attempted to the same degree."
Drowned in Sound (June 2015)

 

Sante

"a dynamic new opera worth everyone's time and hopes” 
The Times


Nightingale and the Rose

"A glorious avant-garde show that was as musically interesting as it was spiritually stirring"

"The highlight was Emily Hall's Nightingale and the Rose, a folk-pop-infused meditation on Wilde's fairy tale. Complemented by Gaelle Denis's incomprehensively lovely film, its central number is a beautiful reworking of Yeat's Down by the Sally Gardens. Two homeless soloists, David Sanchez-Remade and Kevin Woodward, imbued the timeless words with incalculable regret:"But I was young and foolish,"runs the lyric-"and now I'm full of tears". Wow.

Evening Standard 20/12/2010 (4 stars), Kieron Quirke

"A joyful event, culminating in a thrilling rendition of a sea shanty by all four casts, lifting the church roof with exhilerating glee"

"Most sophisticated was a version of Oscar Wilde's The Nightingale and the Rose, shot in a gorgeous glow of Pierre et Giles colours by Gaelle Denis, with a lyrical, folk-inspired score by Emily Hall."
The Daily Telegraph 20/12/2010 (4 Stars) Rupert Christiansen

"The strongest fable, however, focuses on a broken heart and a simple folk song. Company members Victor Sande, David Sanchez-Remade and Kevin Woodward, with Revivalist drones and descants for violin and cello, led Emily Hall's adaptation of The Nightingale and the Rose, a wistful story of unrequited love, sensitively filmed by Gaelle Denis"
Independent on Sunday 26/12/2010 (4 stars) Anna Picard

"Immediately appealing is The Nightingale and the Rose, Emily Hall's delicate interpretation of Oscar Wilde's short story. Cast members fill the church with whistled birdsong before launching a heartfelt refrain that repaets throughout the score and Gaelle Denis's ravishing film."
Financial Times 21/12/2010 (3 stars) Laura Battle


Higher Ground

The two standout pieces inhabited opposite ends of the stylistic spectrum. Anchored in the British song tradition, Emily Hall’s Higher Ground, for treble (Duncan Tarboton) and strings, evokes the legendary sunken town of Aberdovey as a metaphor for the engulfing consequences of climate change.
Guardian, Tim Ashley

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